German Engineered Cigars – A Detailed Review

Modernist design and lifestyle have been combined with the art of cigar crafting to create this fabulous German Engineered Cigar series. This product exhibits a strong German engineering philosophy in its methodical attention to every last detail. They have assured us of a work of avant-garde art.

It is announced that three German engineers founded German Engineered Cigars. Their initial product came out in 2016 under the company’s original moniker, “RVGN Rauchvergnügen.” The company rebranded itself to its current name in 2020, and since then, it has expanded its line of cigars to include a few more varieties.

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

This year, they debuted a brand-new line called “Autonom,” which will feature projects, limited editions, unusual sizes, and experimental mixtures. The Autonom Lineup Pack, the most recent of these initiatives, allows customers to interact with the business and participate in a brand-new range from German Engineered Cigars.

Three cigars in the Autonom Lineup Pack are rolled in three distinct vitolas but have the same blend created by Claudio Sgroi. The concept follows: purchase the pack, light up the cigars, and select your favorite. The normal manufacturing selection of this cigar will include the winning viola and a 5 x 50 Robusto.

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

I’m really into this for a few reasons. I start by emphasizing how important it is to sample several cigar vitolas. Second, I think it’s a great concept to interact with customers and give them a say in making a cigar. In preparation for a Vitola Battle review, I can’t wait to enjoy these cigars and choose my favourite.

1. Specifications

Country of Origin: Nicaragua

Factory: Tabacalera Tambor

Wrapper: Ecuadorian Habano Oscuro

Binder: Nicaragua

Filler: Nicaragua

Vitola: 6 x 42 Corona Grande, 6 x 47 Churchill, 5 x 54 Perfecto

Price: $30.00 MSRP/Pack of 3

Release Date: August 2022

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

2. Packaging

I adore how the three vitolas in the lineup bag are packaged. In addition, I think the band on the cigars is pretty great. The band’s glow-in-the-dark lettering is also really cool, but sadly I could not capture a clear image of it.

  1. Corona Grande: The wrapper on this Corona has a texture similar to that of dry leather. It is closely packed and thick. The cigar has a spicy, cedar scent. It has a hint of cedar and anise, although the cold pull is a little tight.
  2. Churchill: This has a darker brown wrapper that has a lot of oil on it and feels and looks like leather. The cigar feels a little spongy despite being pretty dense.  It has an earthy, meaty, raiseless, and baking spice scent. It tastes just like a sweet potpourri when smoked cold.  
  3. Perfecto: Of all the perfectos I’ve seen, this one has the sharpest head. It truly is stunning. If not, this is just another oily, leathery wrapper leaf. There are black fruit, earth, and cedar notes on the nose of this tightly rolled cigar. There are some grains and chocolate in the chilly draw. It made me think of a chocolate oatmeal stout.
german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

3. Smell & Taste Review

a. First Third of Corona Grande: 

A lot of oak and spice is combined with a medium-bodied smoke flavour at first light. The wood has some char on it before the finish is applied. It takes a few puffs for a decent amount of smoke because the draw is a little tight. The flavours are mild-medium and include some raisins, dirt, and toast at about a half-inch in.

There’s still some baking spice and wood. Except the somewhat tight draw, the performance has been strong as the first third comes to a finish.

Flavor: 2/4

Performance: 2/3

Experience: 1.75/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

b. 2nd third of Corona Grande:

As we approach the second third, the flavour profile remains mild to medium, with wood, spice, toast, and a hint of cocoa as the primary notes on the draw. With a touch of citrus and further toast and wood, the retrohale offers a pleasant flavour boost. As we get closer to the halfway point, the flavour is becoming more medium to medium-full, and the draw opens up a little.

I’m picking up scents of bell pepper, toast, dirt, oily wood, and baking spices on the draw. As we approach the latter third, there is an increasing hint of baking spices. The draw has opened up a little more, but the performance has remained fantastic.

Flavor: 2.5/4

Performance: 2.5/3

Experience: 1.75/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

c. Final Third of Corona Grande:

The latter third begins with rich flavours. They have joined some syrup sweetness and are roughly the same as the end of the second third. I had to put the cigar out and go away for a few minutes to do something else. When I got back, I gave it another go, and the cigar didn’t seem to have any weird flavours, though they’re a little hazy at the moment.

After settling in and reaching the major band, the cigar has returned to revealing notes of citrus, oak, earth, and spices. As it draws to a close, the draw has tightened up a bit more, but the flavours and body are rich, and the strength is medium. An hour and twenty minutes later, there’s a lot of oily wood, pepper, and baking spices. A small amount of char joins the wood and finishes.

Flavor: 2/4

Performance: 2.5/3

Experience: 1.75/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

a. First third of Churchill:

The first light reveals a medium-to-full-bodied smoke with complex notes of soil, leather, rich baking spices, and a hint of sweet potpourri. There’s a hint of woodiness about a half inch in, and the finish is slightly peppery and greasy.

The body reaches its maximum potential halfway through the first third. The draw is rich, luscious black fruit and earthy notes with hints of baking spice and oily pepper. The retrohale tastes of spices and caramel. As we near the end of the first third, the performance is flawless thus far.

Flavor: 3/4

Performance: 3/3

Experience: 2.5/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

b. 2nd third of Churchill:

Rich, savory, and just a hint of sweetness from the meatiness is introduced in the second third of the draw. Less pepper and wood are present, but some moist, sweet, flowery earth and oils remain. As we get closer to the halfway point, a lot of syrupy sweetness, citrus, and black pepper emerge.

There is a tonne of citrus on the draw as the second third draws to a close. In addition to a hint of baking spices and black pepper, the retrohale is very sweet. The performance is still flawless.

Flavor: 3.2/4

Performance: 3/3

Experience: 2.5/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

c. Final Third of Churchill:

The flavours in the last third are largely consistent. I discovered that leaving the cigar on the table for too long will begin to burn. That’s what I had to rapidly touch up after realizing. Oily wood is starting to emerge as the main note in the primary band, followed by some earth and pepper. With two hours and five minutes remaining, the only thing that has changed is the reappearance of a portion of the fragrant, floral ground. Since the touch-up, the performance has been flawless.

Flavor: 3/4

Performance: 1.75/3

Experience: 2/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

a. First third of Perfecto:

The initial light has a strong, flavorful smoke with hints of wood, leather, and dry baking spices. There’s an intriguing combination of earth, fruity pepper, and oiliness on the retrohale. The burn is spreading quickly, but I will wait to touch up until I reach the point. It’s good that I held off since the burn healed itself.

The leather and wood are joined by a hint of earthiness and oil when I go into the thicker part of the cigar. There’s a hint of nuttiness and coffee in the finish. The only noticeable difference is a hint of citrus on the draw as the first third ends with the same flavour.

Flavor: 2/4

Performance: 2/3

Experience: 1.5/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

b. 2nd third of Perfecto:

I proceeded with a minor touch-up because one side of the burn was lagging. About a half inch into the second third, the cigar is still rolling, with very little change in the draw. Some baking spices and dirt have taken on a musty, berry-like note from the retrohale. I had to make a small touch-up to the wrapper halfway through because the filling burned slightly quicker. Not too long after, the draw has changed to a slightly burnt wood/honey blend.

The retrohale is now displaying some rich caramel at midway. After the second third, the draw reveals more honey, a hint of ginger, and some oily wood. As the second third finished, I needed to make one more little adjustment because the wrapper was lagging again. Thankfully, the touch-ups have only been slight.

Flavor: 2.5/4

Performance: 1.25/3

Experience: 1.75/3

german engineered cigars
german engineered cigars

c. Final Third of Perfecto:

There’s a hint of tart chocolate, like chocolate mousse, towards the start of the last third. The finish occasionally has a tootsie roll-like flavour. Sweet citrus shows up on the draw in the latter third. Wood, dirt, and a few baking spices come in second. There’s a hint of pepper and wood on the retrohale and some tart chocolate.

When things become terrible, some pepper enters the draw. I needed to make one more minor touch-up to the band point. The draw still has some citrus, but the main flavours are wood and drying spice. I need to make a minor touch-up as the cigar is almost finished. As it draws to a close at one hour and fifty-one minutes, the profile retains the oak and spice notes while including further pepper and earthiness. Up to the end, the performance went well.

Flavor: 2.25/4

Performance: 1.5/3

Experience: 1.75/3

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